Podcast

Episode #82: Unifying Blockchain Tech


Episode 82
August 28, 2016 — 69 mins
Guests: Anthony Di Iorio

The “vibe” around Bitcoin has been neutral to negative for two years now and plenty of bitcoiners are tiring of the politics around the block size limit. Ethereum is young and exciting but not like anything else in the crypto space. It’s in a league of it’s own. A recurring theme at the Satoshi Roundtable is that Bitcoin problems are leading to rise in Ethereum interest. Enter our guest this week, Anthony Di Iorio, CEO and founder of Jaxx and Decentral, who co-founded ethereum in 2013. Jaxx and ShapeShift together will, without doubt, be the easiest solution for buying ether with bitcoin (and vice versa) ‒ and it’s done right in your Jaxx wallet.

With a focus on unifying the look and feel across multiple devices and platforms (currently 9) and focusing on customer service, security, design, and user experience, our goal is to make the Jaxx Bitcoin and Ethereum wallet default wallet of choice for the masses. Their goal with Jaxx is to create an interface to blockchain for the masses. Kinda like what the browser did for the internet. Head to jaxx.io to find out.

Also we finally talk about our CoinTelegraph expansion with editor and Business Development guy at CoinTelegraph, Mr. Alex Sandoval.

Comments
  1. Robert Kennedy

    3 months ago

    Email is actually older than the internet, and was in fact a key technology that spurred the latter’s development. An early example is MAILBOX at MIT in around 1965. By 1972 Ray Tomlinson invented the use of the “@” symbol for Arpanet email, an idea and use which of course has persisted to this day.

    It wasn’t until the early-to-mid nineties, however, that significant public uptake of email occurred–so it took at least 20 years for “adoption” to happen.

    Patience, boys!

    • Cello

      3 months ago

      Wow, thanks for taking me to school. I appreciate it. TIL 🙂

  2. Chris Navigato

    3 months ago

    Various forms of one-to-one electronic messaging were used in the 1960…SMTP became widely used in the early 1980s…be patient, great things take time